Diverting Your Water

In one’s search for a retirement home and community, many factors exist to consider. Many of the most common are demographics of the residents, location, age of the community, and more. How often, though, do people give serious consideration to the movement of water in the community?

two different ways to divert water from home.

Since 2007, the team at Carolina Plantations has helped thousands of people find their dream location and home to retire to – even if it was not in Coastal NC. During that time, we welcomed nearly 500 families to Brunswick Forest, located in Leland, NC – just 5 minutes from downtown Wilmington. We bring this to your attention because, being as involved as we have been, we have been close to allies with the developer and have been privy to some valuable information.

Anytime you are within 50 miles of the southeastern coast of the US, you need to be concerned with water, for when you hear the phrase “Low Country,” that should associate in your head that low terrain equals high water table. And while our rain levels are pretty standard during the year, we get heavy rainstorms and occasional storm water drains and pipes feverishly moving water – and sometimes, lots of water.

What Choices are there?

When entering a community, you are most aptly to see one of two methods of moving water. The first is using culverts/swales placed in front of your homes. When it rains, these fill up with water, and if it is heavy rain, you might just end up with Lake Winnipesauke on your front lawn. This is because culverts tend to collect water and not move it as intended. And probably most important to note is that these swales tend to get long-standing water, collect garbage, and are hard to maintain.

Choice #2 is where the developer uses curbs and gutters along with sidewalks. This is far more costly than the first option but by far the best for you, the homeowner. Home water is often directed to the street, whereby gravity sends it to a drain. The water goes down the drain and is carried along pipes to a retention pond.

Retention Ponds

Retention ponds can be your friend if the developer has a plan if the ponds overflow. Spillways are commonly factored in, and water from one pond will flow to another at a lower elevation. This continues till the water is sent off the property to an estuary or into the town’s drain system. Retention ponds that do not have a spillway can often flood the homes of those who live around the pond.

showing two different ways that a retention pond works

Numerous communities throughout Brunswick County and Coastal NC do not install stormwater drains, pipes, or sidewalks. Many are older communities but make no mistake; economics drive the water removal issue 99% of the time. Some may say they are more environmentally conscientious; however, now you are armed with the truth!

Be careful when selecting a community and pay attention to how water is moved off your personal property and the community. The last thing you want to do when you retire is to worry about a lake forming in your yard every time it rains. If you’re still on the hunt for a dream retirement home, give our team at Carolina Plantations a call today!

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